First Hate

Anton and Joakim grew up in Copenhagen and met when they were 15 through friends on the street where they lived. “I didn’t enjoy being home so I used to stay at my friend Jakob's basement in an old church on Willemoesgade street,” says Wei. “His mom was the priest. She baptized Anton at age eight during his Jesus phase when he demanded a late baptism from his atheist parents. Jakob was friends with Elias who lived up in Anton’s end and they introduced us to each other. One summer my parents finally married after 20 years of dating. Joakim moved in for two weeks and we accidently trashed the apartment while they were on their honeymoon. At that point everybody in our friend group was making punk music, so the most punk thing we could think to do was start a pop duo.” 


The First Hate catalog comprises more than nine years of work, including their 2017 cult classic, A Prayer For The Unemployed, two EPs and several singles. All of the recordings are self-produced, until they are ready to be finished in the studio. “We have sort of a twin alliance. Like couples finishing each other’s spaghetti at restaurants, we finish each other’s music. Having people enter this sacred mix has been such a pleasure.”

 

First Hate

Anton and Joakim grew up in Copenhagen and met when they were 15 through friends on the street where they lived. “I didn’t enjoy being home so I used to stay at my friend Jakob's basement in an old church on Willemoesgade street,” says Wei. “His mom was the priest. She baptized Anton at age eight during his Jesus phase when he demanded a late baptism from his atheist parents. Jakob was friends with Elias who lived up in Anton’s end and they introduced us to each other. One summer my parents finally married after 20 years of dating. Joakim moved in for two weeks and we accidently trashed the apartment while they were on their honeymoon. At that point everybody in our friend group was making punk music, so the most punk thing we could think to do was start a pop duo.” 


The First Hate catalog comprises more than nine years of work, including their 2017 cult classic, A Prayer For The Unemployed, two EPs and several singles. All of the recordings are self-produced, until they are ready to be finished in the studio. “We have sort of a twin alliance. Like couples finishing each other’s spaghetti at restaurants, we finish each other’s music. Having people enter this sacred mix has been such a pleasure.”

 

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